Final Jeopardy: The Theatre

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The Final Jeopardy question (5/1/2013) in the category “The Theatre” was:

Dramatizing a murder from the year 1170, a 1935 T.S. Eliot play aptly had its first performance in this English city.

2-day champ Larry Krajewski has amassed winnings of $38,200, mopping the floor with the competition in Double Jeopardy! on both days! The question on our minds today is will Larry dominate both rounds or just Double Jeopardy! again? Perhaps he’ll end up singing his swan song courtesy of one of these two players: John Anneken from Cincinnati, OH; and Deborah Smith from Washington, DC.

John found the Jeopardy! round Daily Double in “My Invention Will Be the Death of Me.” He was in the lead with $7,000, $6,800 more than Larry in second place He bet $4,000 and took a guess with “Harris.” That was WRONG.

On October 15, 1863, this Confederate & 7 others sank on the sub that bore his name. show

John finished in the lead with $5,000. Larry was second with $1,200 and Deborah was last with $600.

Larry found the first Double Jeopardy Daily Double in “The Roosevelts.” He was still in second place but now had $3,600. $4,600 less than John’s lead. He bet $3,000 and he was RIGHT.

Teddy Roosevelt was the first president to leave the U.S. while in office, traveling to this Central American County in 1906. show

Larry found the last Daily Double in “‘C’ Birds” Still in second place, he now had $11,000, a mere $800 less than John’s lead. He bet $2,000, but was totally stumped so he was WRONG.

One story has it that this duck got its name from being shipped in sacks with labels asking that the sack be returned. show

John finished in the lead with almost a runaway at $17,800 and Larry was next with $9,400. Deborah finished in the hole at minus $2,200, so she was out of the game at this point.

BOTH remaining contestants got Final Jeopardy! right.

WHAT IS CANTERBURY?

“Murder in the Cathedral” is perhaps T. S. Eliot’s best-known play, based on the murder of Thomas Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170. The play’s first performance was on June 15, 1935 in the Chapter House of Canterbury Cathedral. Robert Speaight played the part of Becket. The production then moved to the Mercury Theatre, Notting Hill Gate in London and ran there for several months.

Larry doubled his score to $18,800. He did pick it up in the second round, but not knowing that last DD dashed his hopes of gaining the lead.

John bet $1,111 so he won the game with $18,911. John Anneken, who dominated most of this game, is now the new Jeopardy! champ.

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